Markus Vinzent's Blog

Thursday, 11 April 2019

1Cor. 14:34 - Should women be silent in church? A disorderly commandment


Working on Marcion's version of the Pauline text of First Corinthians, I noticed that according to both Tertullian and Epiphanius, Marcion's Paul had already the passage about the silencing of women, 1Cor. 14:34. This, of course, is a counterargument to Harnack and others who saw this as a later gloss [Harnack, Mission und Ausbreitung, 590-91, cf. B. Nongbri, ‘Pauline Letter Manuscripts’, in M. Harding and A. Nobbs (eds), All Things to All Cultures: Paul among Jews, Greeks, and Romans (Grand Rapids and Cambridge, 2013) 84-102 at 96; P.H. Payne, ‘Vaticanus Distigme-Obelos Symbols Marking Added Text, Including 1 Corinthians 14.34-35’, NTS 63 (2017) 604-25], unless that gloss  had entered the Pauline text at a rather early stage - pretty hypothetical.

However, contrary to our textus receptus of Paul today, Marcion's Paul must have pointed out with his explicit reference to the Law that this teaching about the silencing and subjugating of women derives from the Law and, therefore, only showed the 'disorderly nature' of the Law (so explicit in the commentary of Epiphanius, somehow also in Tertullian). Hence, instead of a later gloss, I would presume that the Pauline text had been altered later so that the critical note (1Cor. 14:33: 'For God is not characterized by disorder, but by peace') could be misinterpreted. It seems that Marcion's Paul intended by 1Cor. 14:34 to point out the subjugation of women and their silencing in the church was a kind of disorder that was inconsistent with the God of Jesus Christ. This then explains the strong dissent with the earlier statement that women in the congregations are allowed to prophecy.

Monday, 8 April 2019

The Unknown Eckhart

The next topic of the conference of the Meister Eckhart Gesellschaft in 2020 will be "The unknown Eckhart".

Amongst many texts by Eckhart which are rarely studied or quoted, are those that have been edited by critical scholars over the past 150 years, but which have not made their way into the critical edition of Kohlhammer. As this edition is now coming to a close, I am working on an editio minor of these texts, a specimen of one of the homilies will be given below.


Homily * [Jostes 9]
In die consecrationis ecclesie et in anniversario eiusdem
‘Vidi civitatem sanctam Ierusalem novam descendentem de caelo a domino’ etc. (Apoc. 21:2)

Introduction

The passage that Eckhart refers to, Apoc. 21:2 
(‘Vidi civitatem sanctam Ierusalem novam descendentem de caelo a domino’) 
is read on the celebration of the anniversary of the dedication of a church. 
The homily is part of the important Eckhart manuscript N1. 
Fragments are also present in Kla and N2 and there is a parallel to Hom. 29* [Q 43] 
and Hom. 75* [S 96], n. 4. That we find twice the explicit mention of Eckhart 
highlights that we are dealing with Eckhart texts (n. 6: ‘This Meister Eckhart says’; 
n. 9: ‘Meister Eckhart said’), though the text is presented in a redactional form 
which shows that either marginal glosses with reference to the author have been 
integrated into the text or that consciously the text is looked at from a third party 
perspective and moved into the direction of sayings. 
 

The content of the homily

 
The present homily consciously, as stated in n. 3, applies the biblical verse to the soul, 
not only making use of the Latin verse, but also, as often in Eckhart, the wider text that 
is given in the vernacular translation. Consequently, Eckhart comes back at the end 
of the homily to the topic of bride and groom that is present in the vernacular 
translation of the biblical text.
A) In order to avoid that the image of the ‘holy city’ is understood as something static, 
Eckhart introduces the idea that this city that is coming down from heaven is not 
something of the past or something of a unique event, but has to be understood as a 
continuous birthing of the Son by the Father (n. 3). Just as a house that is recently 
built looks brand new, so the soul being created by God is new (n. 4). Newness, 
however, means that the soul needs to keep close to her origin, needs to be even 
within her creator.
B) The biblical author John leads Eckhart to think about ‘grace’ (n. 5). 
In school the question was raised whether grace is a mixture (n. 6). Eckhart 
contradicts and refers to the idea that grace is rather like a spark that falls into the soul. 
Grace is an action that acts in itself, hence means sameness.
C) With reference to Is. 54:1 the preacher shows that birth does not mean 
to produce something, but like grace is an activity in itself (n. 7). Birth is essentially 
self-birthing.
D) Hence, Eckhart is critical towards the alternative of Dominicans and 
Franciscans that either knowledge or will lead to beatitude. He suggests 
that beatitude is only given through beatitude, because divine action does 
not result in activities, but in rest, or rather: sameness (n. 8). Therefore 
God’s word is no word to be spoken out, not a word, to utter something 
alien, but an expression of full intimacy, of a oneness of distinction *n. 7). 
It is like with bride and groom, where mouth comes to mouth, kiss to kiss. 
It is an intimacy of Godd and the soul whereby the soul does not become 
numb, but is made capable of answering God (n. 9). It sounds almost
like a paradox, when Eckhart states: ‘As she has purely carried herself 
into God, so God gives Himself to her, that He works her work in her 
without help, so that she becomes a co-operator with God’. This is 
Eckhart’s precise description of co-operation of God and soul. Even 
though God works His work in the soul, it is the soul’s work, because 
God and the soul are not two different agents, but one. To be a co-operator 
with God does not mean that the soul is the passive part in this activity, 
but God has made her answer. Both are one, and yet, they are two. 
Both speak, both kiss, both love.
The homily ends in a short prayer that this may happen to us (n. 10).
 
 

Editions, commentaries and notes

F. Jostes, Nr. 9, 4,30-6,30.

Previous English translations

No previous translation.

Text and translation


<:1>‘Vidi civitatem sanctam Jherusalem’
<:1>‘Vidi civitatem sanctam Ierusalem’[1]
<:2>Sand Johannes sach in dem geist ‘ein stat’, die waz heilig und heiz Jherusalem; di stat waz niwe, si chom her nider vom himel und waz gemacht von golt und waz geziret alz ein braut irm man.
<:2>Saint John saw in a vision ‘a city’ which was holy and named Jerusalem; the city was new, came down from heaven, was made of gold and was ornated as a bride for her groom.
<:3>Daz wil ich auf di sel bringen. Der sun ist ewiclichen gewesen in dem vater, und er gebirt sinen sun an underlaz, und di geburt ist alle zeit newe. Waz bei sinem angang ist, daz ist newe. Ein hauz, daz gestern gemacht ward, daz ist heut newe, wan ez ist nahen bei sinem angange.
<:3>This I will refer to the soul. The Son has eternally been in the Father, and He gives birth to His Son without interruption, and the birth is new all the time. What is close to its beginning, is new. A house that was built yesterday, today is new, because it is near to its beginning.
<:4>Got schuf di sel in seinem einborn sun und bildet si in im und sach si in im, wie si im wehagte: do wehagt si im wol. Die sel, deu niwe sol sein, di schol sich halten al mittel in got und sich wider bilden in sinem einborn sun und schol wereit sein zu enphahen an underlaz den influz von got.
<:4>God created the soul in his inborn Son and formed her in Him and placed her in Him, as she pleased Him. There she pleased Him well. The soul, that was meant to be new, must keep herself by all means in god and form herself into His inborn Son and must be prepared to receive the influx of God without interruption.
<:5>Unser herre wart gefraget, wer sand Johannes wer, ob er wer ein prophete. Er ist mer den ein prophete: allez daz die propheten ye geprophetizierten, daz geschach in eim naturlich lauf. S. Johannes waz alz verre gezogen uber di natur, daz alle creatur warn ze grob dar zu, daz si sine werch enphahen mochten.
<:5>Our Lord was asked, who Saint John was, whether he was a prophet. He is more than a prophet: Everything that the prophets ever prophesied, naturally happened. Saint John was pulled so far beyond nature that all creatures were too coarse to be able to receive his works.
<:6>Johannes ist alz vil gesprochen alz gnad. Nu wart gefragt ein w=rtlein in unser schFl, daz di gnad wart mangerlei. Antwort ich dar zu und sprach: si enhert ni nicht auz einem trephelin, aber ein funkelin daz vellet wol auz der gnad in di sel, daz hat alz vil creft in im, daz dar uuz entspringent di creft der sel, wechantnuzze und gelaub und minne, di werden webeget. Waz ist gnad? Gnad, alz gnad an ir selber ist, so enwurht si niht uz, mer sie wurcht inn. Wer ein mensch, der diser gnad het ein tr=pflin, der het mer gutes und [wer] inreilicher gefugt in daz redlich wesen an werch, alzo, geworcht er nimmer niht und sliff all weg, nochden wer er neher got und inreilich[er] got. Ich sprich: wer daz ein mensch do sich hundertstund eines tages lizze brennen leuterlichen durch got, alle sine werch ch=nden im nit gehelffen dar zu, daz er kond in daz ungeborn wesen gefugt werden alz dicz mensch an werch. Waz ist gnad? gnad wurchet ein indem bodem der sel; da nie geburt in gedacht ward, da wurket gnad in und wurkt alz verre in, daz di drei ein wesen sein. Got und gnad sint alzo glich, wo got furget, do treit er di gnad auf dem nikken. Dicz spricht meister Ekkart.
<:6>John means as much as grace.[2] Now, one has asked a small question in our school, whether grace was a mixture. To this I answered and said: it never hardens out of a drop, but a spark quite falls out of grace into the soul which has so much power in it that from it come forth the powers of the soul, knowledge, belief and love, they are set in move. What is grace? Grace as grace by itself does not work externally, it rather works internally. If there were a human being who had a drop of this grace, he had more goodness and were more inwardly placed into the rational being without a work, hence, he would never work and slept everywhere, as much as he were nearer by and inwardly in God. I say, if there were a human being who would let himself purely burn by God for a hundred hours a day, none of his works could help him to be placed into the unborn being like this human being without a work. What is grace? Grace works within the ground of the soul. Wherein birth was never conceived of, in there grace works and it works in there so much, so that the three are one being. Hence, God and grace are the same, where God walks on, He carries grace on His neck. This Meister Eckhart says.
<:7>Der prophet spricht: Frawe sich auf der der nicht gebirt diner frucht der ist vil, der ist wol tausend stund mer dan di frucht gebernd sind in der werlt, der ist an zal vil. Di sel hat ein naturlich licht in ir. In dem naturlichen licht hat got mer lustes und me genug dan in allen creaturen, die er ie geschuff: er verzirt alle sin craft in dem naturlichen liht. Nem man ein schwarzen kolen: alz unglich der wer wider [den] himel, alzo sind alle creatur wider dem naturlichen licht, daz di sel in ir treit. Wan si ingetragen wird in daz liht, so gebirt si sich selben und ir selber in ir selber, und gebirt sich wider sich selber in sich. Si verleust alz gar alle di gebFrt und wirt alz gar uber sich derhaben und wirt alz gar geneiget ein in ein. Si chFmt dar zu, daz si got gebirt, alz sich got selbe gebirt; und da geschiecht rehte einung trucz allen creaturen, trucz den engeln, trucz got selbe, daz er da einik unterscheid vinde.
<:7>The prophet says: ‘Rejoice, o barren one who does not bear your fruit, there are many’, there are quite thousand times more than those who bear fruit in this world, they are numerous.[3] The soul has a natural light in herself. In this light, God has more pleasure and is more satisfied than in all creatures that he has ever created: He spends all his power in this natural light. If one takes a [piece of] black charcoal: As dissimilar this were compared to heaven, so are all creatures compared to the natural light, that the soul carries in herself. When she is carried into this light, then she gives birth to herself and for herself in herself, and, again, gives birth to herself in herself. Then she leaves birth and becomes elevated above herself and inclined to be one in one. She finally gives birth to God as God gives birth to Himself; and there true oneness happens, despite all creatures, despite the angels, despite God Himself, so that there He finds oneness of distinction.
<:8>Sümlich meister die suchen selicheit an bechantnuzze oder an willen: ich sprich, daz selicheit weder an wechantnuzze noch an willen en liet. Daz ist selicheit, daz sie l[ie]t[4] alle selicheit, daz ist alle ir selbesheit. Der himel wurchet alle sine werch darum, daz er sich got gelichen wil: niht daz er sich gelichen wol an den werchen, mer er sFcht reuwe, alzo alz daz wesen ist an werch: daz selbe sucht der himel, daz er cheme in ein stille stan. Sucht dicz der himel und ander creatur, di snoder ist, waz solten wir danne tun? Da belibet got got, da belibet selicheit selicheit und gnad gnad und sel sel.
<:8>All masters seek blessedness either in knowledge or will. I say that blessedness is given neither through knowledge nor will. Blessedness entirely is blessedness, it is entirely being itself. The heaven works all its works, in order to adjust itself to God. Not that it wants to adjust to its works, rather it seeks rest, just as the being is in works. The heaven seeks the same that it may come to a stand still. If the heaven and all other creatures that are less than it, seek this, what are we to do? There God remains God, there blessedness remains blessedness and grace grace and the soul the soul.
<:9>Meister Ekkart sprach: got der wer ein spruch an spruch und wer ein wort an wort, und in dem werden lebendich alle creatur und waschende. Wer hat daz wort gesprochen und den spruch gesprochen? Der himlisch vater der hat in gesprochen in sinem eingeborn sun. Mag daz wort [und den spruch] nimant gesprechen? Nein, den mag niemant gesprechen dan der himlisch vater, und wirt doch gesprochen. Wenn wirt er gesprochen und wo wirt er gesprochen? Wenn die sel chein genug hat an cheiner creatur und si sich ze mal in got getragen hat mit allen iren werchen und ir selbs vergezzen hat und meint got lauterlichen; da gibt got mer dan si selb immer gedenken mag. Alz si sich alzo leuterlichen in got getragen hat, so gibt sich ir got alzo, daz er ir werch wurket in ir an erbeit, daz si sei ein mitwurcherin mit got. Und wo wirt er gesprochen? Wen daz alleroberst teil der [sel] bloz und ledich ze mal vereint wird mit got, da wirt daz wort gesprochen und der spruch, und da ist mund zu mund kumen und da ist kFz ze kFz chumen, und di sel verstet daz wort in dem wort und nieman mer; und di sel di chunde auch etwaz dar auf geworten. Hie ist di sel zu irm aller obersten kumen.
<:9>Meister Eckhart said that God would be a saying without saying and would be a word without a word, and that in Him would come alive all creatures and all that grows. Who has spoken the word and has spoken the saying? The heavenly Father, he has spoken it in his inborn Son. Can nobody speak the word [and the saying]? No, nobody can speak it except the heavenly Father, and yet, it is spoken. When is it spoken and where is it spoken? When the soul does not longer satisfies itself with any creature and has herself entirely carried into God and with all her works and has forgotten about herself and purely thinks of God; there God gives more than she herself has ever dreamt of. As she has purely carried herself into God, so God gives Himself to her, that He works her work in her without help, so that she becomes a co-operator with God. Und were is it spoken? When the highest part of the [soul] is naked and free, entirely united with God, there the word and the saying are spoken, and there come mouth to mouth and kiss to kiss, and the soul understands the word in the word and nobody else; and the soul could answer to it. Here, the soul has arrived in her highest part.
<:10>Daz uns dicz gesche, dez helf unz got.
<:10>That this may happen to us, may God help us!




[1] See Apoc. 21:2 (Vidi civitatem sanctam Ierusalem novam descendentem de caelo a domino). The context is Apoc. 21:2–5 and can be found in Collectarium, Arch. f. 432ra: ‘In die consecrationis ecclesie et in anniversario eiusdem. Lectio libri Apocalipsis beati Iohannis apostoli. In diebus illis vidi civitatem sanctam [Et ego Ioannes vidi sanctam civitatem Vg.] Iherusalem novam descendentem de celo a Deo, paratam, sicut sponsam ortatam viro suo. Et audivi vocem magnam de throno dicentem: Ecce tabernaculum Dei cum hominibus, et habitabit cum eis. Et ipsi populus eius erunt, et ipse Deus cum eis erit eorum Deus: et absterget Deus omne lacrimam ab oculis eorum, et mors ultra non erit, neque luctus, neque clamor, neque dolor erit ultra, quia prima abierunt. Et dixit qui sedebat in throno: Ecce nova facio omnia’.
[2] For ‘John’ in the sense of ‘grace’, see Hom. 75* [S 96], n. 4.  Hieronymus, Liber interpretationis Hebraicorum nominum (Lagarde 136, 6–7): ‘Iohannan cui est gratia uel domini gratia’.
[3] Is. 54:1: ‘Lauda, sterilis, quae non paris; decanta laudem, et hinni, quae non pariebas: quoniam multi filii desertae magis quam eius quae habeat virum, dicit Dominus’; see also Gal. 4:27: ‘Rejoice, O barren one who does not bear children; break forth and cry aloud, you who are not in labour! For the children of the desolate one will be more than those of the one who has a husband’ (‘Laetare sterilis, quae non paris: erumpe, et exclama, quae non parturis: quia multi filii desertae, magis quam eius quae habet virum’); on the two verses see Hom. 26* [S 99]. Unfortunately, the English language does not allow the word play between ‘gebernd’ (to bear fruit) and ‘gebernd’ (to give birth).
[4] The ms. mistakenly has ‘leit’.

Der unbekannte Eckhart

Thema der nächsten Konferenz der Meister Eckhart Gesellschaft in 2020 wird sein "Der unbekannte Eckhart", dazu zählen auch Texte, die in der Vergangenheit von der kritischen Forschung Eckhart zugeschrieben, die aber noch selten berücksichtigt, nicht in der kritischen Werkausgabe bei Kohlhammer erschienen sind, und zu denen auch keine Übersetzung vorliegen.

Um hier Abhilfe zu schaffen, sollen diese Texte in einer editio minor erscheinen, zu der hier ein erstes Beispiel gegeben wird.


Predigt * [Jostes 9]
In die consecrationis ecclesie et in anniversario eiusdem
‘Vidi civitatem sanctam Ierusalem novam descendentem de caelo a domino’ etc. (Apk. 21,2)

Einführung

Der Schriftvers, auf den sich Eckhart bezieht, entstammt der Apokalypse (21,2) 
(‘Vidi civitatem sanctam Ierusalem novam descendentem de caelo a domino’). 
Der Vers wird in der Lesung am Jahrestag eines Kirchweihfests vorgetragen. 
Die Predigt findet sich in der Handschrift N1. Fragmente des Textes finden sich in 
Kla und N2, ausserdem gibt es Parallelen zu Hom. 29* [Q 43] und Hom. 75* [S 96], 
n. 4. Der zweimalige ausdrückliche Hinweis auf Meister Eckhart ist ein äußerliches 
Zeugnis dafür, dass wir es hier mit Eckhartgut zu tun haben (n. 6: „Dies sagt Meister 
Eckhart“; n. 9: „Meister Eckhart sprach“), auch wenn dadurch verdeutlicht wird, 
dass der Text in einer Redaktionsstufe vorliegt, in welcher entweder Glossen mit 
Autorenverweisen in den Haupttext eingedrungen sind, oder bewusst in äußerer 
Draufsicht der Text in Richtung Sprüche entwickelt wurde.
 

Der Predigtinhalt

Die vorliegende Predigt legt ganz bewusst, wie n. 3 angibt, den neutestamentlichen Spruch 
auf die Seele aus, und zwar nicht nur die kurze lateinische Fassung, sondern, wie bei Eckhart 
häufiger, die erweiterte Fassung, die der Prediger in seiner deutschen Übertragung gibt. 
Denn am Ende kommt er ausdrücklich auf die Brautthematik der innigsten Vereinigung 
anhand der körperlichen Bilder zurück.
A) Um zu vermeiden, dass das Bild der heiligen Stadt als etwas Starres missverstanden wird, 
baut Eckhart vor, dass mit der „heiligen Stadt“, die vom Himmel herabkommt, nichts 
einmaliges gemeint ist, sondern die beständige Geburt des Sohnes aus dem Vater (n. 3). 
Wie das Haus, das gerade gebaut wurde und noch ganz neu erscheint, so ist auch die von 
Gott geschaffene Seele neu (n. 4). Doch Neuheit heißt, dass sich die Seele ganz nahe bei 
ihrem Schöpfer, oder eigentlich in ihrem Schöpfer, aufhalten muss.
B) Der Schriftautor Johannes führt Eckhart zum Thema „Gnade“ (n. 5). Nun stellte man 
in der Schule die Frage, ob Gnade eine „Mischung“ sei (n. 6). Dies lehnt Eckhart ab, 
verweist aber auf den Gedanken, dass die Gnade wie ein Fünklein sei, das in die Seele fällt. 
Gnade wird sodann als ein Wirken in sich selbst, in Selbigkeit vorgestellt.
C) Mit Hinweis auf Is. 54,1 wird gezeigt, dass Geburt ohne Frucht und Werke das Wirken 
der Gnade ausdrücken (n. 7). Wesentliche Geburt ist Selbstgeburt.
D) Drum nimmt Eckhart kritisch Stellung sowohl gegenüber der dominikanischen wie 
der franziskanischen Alternative, ob nämlich Seligkeit durch Erkenntnis oder durch 
Willen geschieht. Er optiert für keine der beiden Lösungen, sondern schlägt vor, dass 
Seligkeit nur durch Seligkeit gegeben ist, weil göttliches Wirken nicht Werkeln, sondern 
Ruhe anzielt, oder anders ausgedrückt: Selbigkeit (n. 8). Folglich ist auch Gottes Wort 
kein Wort nach draußen, nicht ein Wort, um etwas Fremdes auszusprechen, sondern 
Ausdruck völliger Intimität, einer einigen Unterschiedenheit wie bei Braut und Bräutigam, 
wo Mund zu Mund und Kuss zu Kuss kommen. Es ist aber keine Intimität zwischen Gott 
und Seele, die die Seele verstummen lässt, sondern in der sie zur Antwort befähigt bleibt (n. 9). 
Fast wie ein Paradox klingt die Aussage „Wenn sie sich so durch und durch in Gott 
hineingetragen hat, gibt sich ihr Gott, auf dass er ihr Werk wirkt in ihr ohne Zutun, 
auf dass sie sei eine Mitwirkerin Gottes“. Doch ist es Eckharts präzise Umschreibung 
der Kooperation. Auch wenn Gott das Werk der Seele in der Seele wirkt, ist es doch 
der Seele Werk, weil Gott und Seele eben keine zwei Akteure sind. Doch da es eine 
einige Unterschiedenheit ist, in der dies geschieht, bedarf es des Zutuns der Seele gar 
nicht, und sie ist doch eine Mitwirkerin Gottes, nicht im Sinne einer reinen Passivität, 
wie man sieht, sondern in einer Form, in der ihr Antworten das Antworten Gottes selbst 
ist bzw. das Sprechen das Sprechen der Seele selbst.
Die Predigt endet mit einer kurzen Bitte, dass uns dies geschehen möge (n. 10).
 
 

Editionen und Kommentare

F. Jostes, Nr. 9, 4,30-6,30.

Ältere deutsche Übersetzungen

Keine.

Text und Übersetzung


<:1>‘Vidi civitatem sanctam Jherusalem’
<:1>‘Vidi civitatem sanctam Ierusalem’[1]
<:2>Sand Johannes sach in dem geist ‘ein stat’, die waz heilig und heiz Jherusalem; di stat waz niwe, si chom her nider vom himel und waz gemacht von golt und waz geziret alz ein braut irm man.
<:2>Im Geist sah der heilige Johannes “eine Stadt”, die heilig war und Jerusalem hieß; die Stadt war neu, sie kam vom Himmel herab, war aus Gold gemacht und war geschmückt wie eine Braut für ihren Bräutigam.
<:3>Daz wil ich auf di sel bringen. Der sun ist ewiclichen gewesen in dem vater, und er gebirt sinen sun an underlaz, und di geburt ist alle zeit newe. Waz bei sinem angang ist, daz ist newe. Ein hauz, daz gestern gemacht ward, daz ist heut newe, wan ez ist nahen bei sinem angange.
<:3>Dies will ich auf die Seele beziehen. Der Sohn war ewig im Vater, und er gebiert beständig seinen Son, und die Geburt ist allzeit eine neue. Was an seinem Ausgang ist, das ist neu. Ein Haus, das gestern gebaut wurde, das ist heute neu, denn es ist nahe bei seinem Ausgang.
<:4>Got schuf di sel in seinem einborn sun und bildet si in im und sach si in im, wie si im wehagte: do wehagt si im wol. Die sel, deu niwe sol sein, di schol sich halten al mittel in got und sich wider bilden in sinem einborn sun und schol wereit sein zu enphahen an underlaz den influz von got.
<:4>Gott schuf die Seele in seinem eingeborenen Sohn und formt sie in ihm und sah sie in ihm, wie sie ihm gefiel: Da gefiel sie ihm gut. Die Seele, die neu sein soll, die soll sich mit jeglichem Mittel in Gott halten und sich zurückformen in seinen eingeborenen Sohn und soll beständig bereit sein, das Einfließen von Gott zu empfangen.
<:5>Unser herre wart gefraget, wer sand Johannes wer, ob er wer ein prophete. Er ist mer den ein prophete: allez daz die propheten ye geprophetizierten, daz geschach in eim naturlich lauf. S. Johannes waz alz verre gezogen uber di natur, daz alle creatur warn ze grob dar zu, daz si sine werch enphahen mochten.
<:5>Unser Herr wurde gefragt, wer der heilige Johannes sei, ob er ein Prophet sei. Er ist mehr als nur ein Prophet: Alles, was die Propheten je prophezeiten, geschah auf natürliche Weise. Der heilige Johannes wurde soweit über die Natur hinaus gezogen, dass jegliche Kreatur zu ungehobelt war, sein Werk zu empfangen.
<:6>Johannes ist alz vil gesprochen alz gnad. Nu wart gefragt ein w=rtlein in unser schFl, daz di gnad wart mangerlei. Antwort ich dar zu und sprach: si enhert ni nicht auz einem trephelin, aber ein funkelin daz vellet wol auz der gnad in di sel, daz hat alz vil creft in im, daz dar uuz entspringent di creft der sel, wechantnuzze und gelaub und minne, di werden webeget. Waz ist gnad? Gnad, alz gnad an ir selber ist, so enwurht si niht uz, mer sie wurcht inn. Wer ein mensch, der diser gnad het ein tr=pflin, der het mer gutes und [wer] inreilicher gefugt in daz redlich wesen an werch, alzo, geworcht er nimmer niht und sliff all weg, nochden wer er neher got und inreilich[er] got. Ich sprich: wer daz ein mensch do sich hundertstund eines tages lizze brennen leuterlichen durch got, alle sine werch ch=nden im nit gehelffen dar zu, daz er kond in daz ungeborn wesen gefugt werden alz dicz mensch an werch. Waz ist gnad? gnad wurchet ein indem bodem der sel; da nie geburt in gedacht ward, da wurket gnad in und wurkt alz verre in, daz di drei ein wesen sein. Got und gnad sint alzo glich, wo got furget, do treit er di gnad auf dem nikken. Dicz spricht meister Ekkart.
<:6>Johannes bedeutet soviel wie Gnade.[2] Nun wurde in unserer Schule eine Frage gestellt, ob die Gnade eine Mischung sei. Hierauf antwortete ich und sagte: Sie verhärtet sich nicht aus einem Tropfen, doch ein Funke fällt schon aus der Gnade in die Seele, der soviel Kraft in sich hat, dass aus ihm die Kräfte der Seele entspringen, Erkenntnis, Glaube und Liebe, die in Bewegung versetzt werden. Was ist Gnade? Gnade, insofern sie in sich Gnade ist, wirkt nicht draußen, sie wirkt vielmehr drinnen. Gäbe es einen Menschen, der einen Tropfen von dieser Gnade hätte, der besäße mehr vom Guten und wer innerlicher in das vernünftige Sein gefügt ohne Werk, folglich wirkte er niemals und schlief überall, so sehr er näher bei Gott und innerlicher in Gott wäre. Ich sage, gäbe es einen Menschen, der sich hundert Stunden am Tag durch Gott rein brennen ließe, so könnten doch keine seiner Werke ihm dazu helfen, in das ungeborene Sein gefügt werden zu können wie diesem Menschen ohne Werk. Was ist Gnade? Gnade wirkt in dem Grund der Seele; worin niemals an Geburt gedacht wurde, darin wirkt Gnade und wirkt so sehr darin, dass die drei ein Sein sind. Folglich sind Gott und Gnade so sehr dasselbe, dass, wenn Gott vorangeht, da trägt er die Gnade in seinem Nacken. Dies sagt Meister Eckhart.
<:7>Der prophet spricht: Frawe sich auf der der nicht gebirt diner frucht der ist vil, der ist wol tausend stund mer dan di frucht gebernd sind in der werlt, der ist an zal vil. Di sel hat ein naturlich licht in ir. In dem naturlichen licht hat got mer lustes und me genug dan in allen creaturen, die er ie geschuff: er verzirt alle sin craft in dem naturlichen liht. Nem man ein schwarzen kolen: alz unglich der wer wider [den] himel, alzo sind alle creatur wider dem naturlichen licht, daz di sel in ir treit. Wan si ingetragen wird in daz liht, so gebirt si sich selben und ir selber in ir selber, und gebirt sich wider sich selber in sich. Si verleust alz gar alle di gebFrt und wirt alz gar uber sich derhaben und wirt alz gar geneiget ein in ein. Si chFmt dar zu, daz si got gebirt, alz sich got selbe gebirt; und da geschiecht rehte einung trucz allen creaturen, trucz den engeln, trucz got selbe, daz er da einik unterscheid vinde.
<:7>Der Prophet sagt: “Freu Dich, Unfruchtbare, die nicht deine Frucht gebiert, ihrer sind viel”, ihrer sind wohl tausendmal mehr als diejenigen, die Frucht hervorbringen in der Welt, ihre Zahl ist groß.[3] Die Seele hat ein natürliches Licht in sich. An dem natürlichen Licht hat Gott mehr Freude und mehr Genüge als an allen Kreaturen, die er je geschaffen hat: Er verzehrt all seine Kraft an dem natürlichen Licht. Nimmt man eine schwarze Kohle: So ungleich diese verglichen mit dem Himmel ist, so sind alle Kreaturen verglichen mit dem natürlichen Licht, das die Seele in sich trägt. Wenn sie hineingetragen wird in dieses Licht, dann gebiert sie sich selber und für sich selber in sich selber, und sie gebiert sich wieder selbst in sich. Sie verlässt dann all die Geburt und wird so sehr über sich erhaben und wird dann geneigt als eines in eines. Sie kommt soweit, dass sie Gott gebiert, wie sich Gott selbst gebiert; und da geschieht rechte Einung trotz aller Kreaturen, trotz der Engel, trotz Gott selbst, so dass er dort die einige Unterscheidung findet.
<:8>SFmlich meister die suchen selicheit an bechantnuzze oder an willen: ich sprich, daz selicheit weder an wechantnuzze noch an willen en liet. Daz ist selicheit, daz sie l[ei]t[4] alle selicheit, daz ist alle ir selbesheit. Der himel wurchet alle sine werch darum, daz er sich got gelichen wil: niht daz er sich gelichen wol an den werchen, mer er sFcht reuwe, alzo alz daz wesen ist an werch: daz selbe sucht der himel, daz er cheme in ein stille stan. Sucht dicz der himel und ander creatur, di snoder ist, waz solten wir danne tun? Da belibet got got, da belibet selicheit selicheit und gnad gnad und sel sel.
<:8>Sämtliche Meister suchen Seligkeit entweder ohne Erkenntnis oder ohne Willen: Ich spreche, dass Seligkeit weder im Erkennen noch im Willen liegt. Das ist Seligkeit, dass sie vollends Seligkeit ist, es ist vollends ihre Selbigkeit. Der Himmel wirkt all seine Werke, weil er sich Gott angleichen will, nicht, dass er sich den Werken angleichen will, vielmehr sucht er nach Ruhe, wie nämlich das Sein im Werk. Dasselbe sucht der Himmel, dass er zum Stillstand komme. Wenn dies der Himmel und die übrige Kreatur, die niedriger ist, suchen, was sollten wir dann tun? Da bleibt Gott Gott, da bleibt Seligkeit Seligkeit und Gnade Gnade und die Seele die Seele.
<:9>Meister Ekkart sprach: got der wer ein spruch an spruch und wer ein wort an wort, und in dem werden lebendich alle creatur und waschende. Wer hat daz wort gesprochen und den spruch gesprochen? Der himlisch vater der hat in gesprochen in sinem eingeborn sun. Mag daz wort [und den spruch] nimant gesprechen? Nein, den mag niemant gesprechen dan der himlisch vater, und wirt doch gesprochen. Wenn wirt er gesprochen und wo wirt er gesprochen? Wenn die sel chein genug hat an cheiner creatur und si sich ze mal in got getragen hat mit allen iren werchen und ir selbs vergezzen hat und meint got lauterlichen; da gibt got mer dan si selb immer gedenken mag. Alz si sich alzo leuterlichen in got getragen hat, so gibt sich ir got alzo, daz er ir werch wurket in ir an erbeit, daz si sei ein mitwurcherin mit got. Und wo wirt er gesprochen? Wen daz alleroberst teil der [sel] bloz und ledich ze mal vereint wird mit got, da wirt daz wort gesprochen und der spruch, und da ist mund zu mund kumen und da ist kFz ze kFz chumen, und di sel verstet daz wort in dem wort und nieman mer; und di sel di chunde auch etwaz dar auf geworten. Hie ist di sel zu irm aller obersten kumen.
<:9>Meister Eckhart sprach: Gott sei ein Spruch ohne Spruch und sei ein Wort ohne Wort, und in ihm werden lebendig alle Kreatur und alle, die wachsen. Wer hat das Wort gesprochen und den Spruch ausgesprochen? Der himmlische Vater, der hat ihn gesprochen in seinem eingeborenen Sohn. Kann das Wort [und den Spruch] niemand aussprechen? Nein, das kann niemand aussprechen, es sei denn der himmlische Vater, und doch wird es ausgesprochen. Wenn die Seele kein Genüge mehr findet an einer Kreatur und sie sich völlig in Gott hineingetragen hat mit all ihren Werken und sich seiner selbst vergessen hat und durch und durch Gott im Sinn hat. Da gibt Gott [ihr] Gott mehr als sie selbst sich je vorstellen kann. Wenn sie sich so durch und durch in Gott hineingetragen hat, gibt sich ihr Gott, auf dass er ihr Werk wirkt in ihr ohne Zutun, auf dass sie sei eine Mitwirkerin Gottes. Und wo wird es gesprochen? Wenn der alleroberste Teil der [Seele] nackt und frei völlig geeint ist mit Gott, dort werden das Wort und der Spruch ausgesprochen, und dort kommt Mund zu Mund, und dort kommt Kuss zum Kuss, und die Seele versteht das Wort in dem Wort und niemand anderes; und die Seele kann auch etwas darauf antworten. Hier ist die Seele in ihrem Allerobersten angekommen.
<:10>Daz uns dicz gesche, dez helf unz got.
<:10>Auf dass uns dies geschehe, darum helfe uns Gott!



[1] See Apoc. 21:2 (Vidi civitatem sanctam Ierusalem novam descendentem de caelo a domino). The context is Apoc. 21:2–5 and can be found in Collectarium, Arch. f. 432ra: ‘In die consecrationis ecclesie et in anniversario eiusdem. Lectio libri Apocalipsis beati Iohannis apostoli. In diebus illis vidi civitatem sanctam [Et ego Ioannes vidi sanctam civitatem Vg.] Iherusalem novam descendentem de celo a Deo, paratam, sicut sponsam ortatam viro suo. Et audivi vocem magnam de throno dicentem: Ecce tabernaculum Dei cum hominibus, et habitabit cum eis. Et ipsi populus eius erunt, et ipse Deus cum eis erit eorum Deus: et absterget Deus omne lacrimam ab oculis eorum, et mors ultra non erit, neque luctus, neque clamor, neque dolor erit ultra, quia prima abierunt. Et dixit qui sedebat in throno: Ecce nova facio omnia’.
[2] Für die Interpretation von “Johannes” als “Gnade” vgl. Hom. 75* [S 96], n. 4.  Hieronymus, Liber interpretationis Hebraicorum nominum (Lagarde 136, 6–7): ‘Iohannan cui est gratia uel domini gratia’.
[3] Is. 54,1: “Lauda, sterilis, quae non paris; decanta laudem, et hinni, quae non pariebas: quoniam multi filii desertae magis quam eius quae habeat virum, dicit Dominus”; vgl. auch Gal. 4,27: “Laetare sterilis, quae non paris: erumpe, et exclama, quae non parturis: quia multi filii desertae, magis quam eius quae habet virum”; zu diesen zwei Versen vgl. Hom. 26* [S 99]. Leider kann man im Deutschen das Wortspiel zwischen „gebern“ (Frucht bringen) und „gebern“ (gebähren) nicht nachahmen.
[4] Die Handschrift hat fälschlicherweise „leit“.